Posts tagged “novel

2014 Bram Stoker awards® Preliminary Ballot announced

Reposting this to fix my error. This is the preliminary ballot. Sorry for any confusion.

I would like to congratulate all of these fantastic and talented people on making the preliminary ballot for the 2014 Bram Stoker Awards®. Click any link to find out more about that selection.

Superior Achievement in a Novel
Tim Burke – The Flesh Sutra (NobleFusion Press)
Adam Christopher – The Burning Dark (Tor Books)
Michaelbrent Collings – This Darkness Light (self-published)
Lawrence C. Connolly – Vortex (Fantasist Enterprises)
Craig DiLouie – Suffer the Children (Gallery Books of Simon & Schuster)
Patrick Freivald – Jade Sky (JournalStone)
Chuck Palahniuk – Beautiful You (Jonathan Cape, Vintage/Penguin Random House UK)
Christopher Rice – The Vines (47North)
Brett J. Talley – The Reborn (JournalStone)
Steve Rasnic Tem – Blood Kin (Solaris Books)

Superior Achievement in a First Novel
Maria Alexander – Mr. Wicker (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
J.D. Barker – Forsaken (Hampton Creek Press)
Janice Gable Bashman – Predator (Month9Books)
David Cronenberg – Consumed (Scribner)
Michael Knost – Return of the Mothman (Woodland Press)
Daniel Levine – Hyde (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
Josh Malerman – Bird Box (Harper Collins)
Whitney Miller – The Violet Hour (Flux)
Chantal Noordeloos – Angel Manor (Horrific Tales Publishing)
C.J. Waller – Predator X (Severed Press)

Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel
Ari Berk – Lych Way (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers)
Jake Bible – Intentional Haunting (Permuted Press)
Ilsa J. Bick – White Space (Egmont)
John Dixon – Phoenix Island (Simon & Schuster/Gallery Books)
Kami Garcia – Unmarked (The Legion Series Book 2) (Little Brown Books for Young Readers)
S.E. Green – Killer Instinct (Simon & Schuster/Simon Pulse)
Tonya Hurley – Passionaries (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Micol Ostow – Amity (Egmont)
Peter Adam Salomon – All Those Broken Angels (Flux)
Sam Swanson and Araminta Star Matthews – Horror High School: Return of the Loving Dead (Curiosity Quills Press)
Johnny Worthen – Eleanor: Book 1 (The Unseen) (Jolly Fish Press)

Superior Achievement in a Graphic Novel
Charles Burns – Sugar Skull
Emily Carroll – Through the Woods
Victor Gischler – Kiss Me Satan
Joe Hill – Locke and Key, Vol. 6
Joe R. Lansdale and Daniele Serra – I Tell You It’s Love (Short, Scary Tales Publications)
Jonathan Maberry – Bad Blood (Dark Horse Books)
Paul Tobin – The Witcher

Superior Achievement in Long Fiction
Michael Bailey – Dandelion Clocks (Inkblots and Blood Spots) (Villipede Publications)
Taylor Grant – The Infected (Cemetery Dance #71) (Cemetery Dance)
Eric J. Guignard – Dreams of a Little Suicide (Hell Comes To Hollywood II: Twenty-Two More Tales Of Tinseltown Terror (Volume 2)) (Big Time Books)
Kate Jonez – Ceremony of Flies (DarkFuse)
Joe R. Lansdale – Fishing for Dinosaurs (Limbus, Inc., Book II) (JournalStone)
Jonathan Maberry – Three Guys Walk Into a Bar (Limbus, Inc., Book II) (JournalStone)
Joe McKinney – Lost and Found (Limbus, Inc., Book II) (JournalStone)
Gene O’Neill – Ridin the Dawg (Mia Moja) (Thunderstorm Books)
John F.D. Taff – The Long Long Breakdown (The End in all Beginnings) (Grey Matter Press)
Gregor Xane – The Riggle Twins (Bad Apples) (Corpus Press)

Superior Achievement in Short Fiction
Dale Bailey – Sleep Paralysis (Nightmare Magazine, April 2014) (Nightmare)
Hal Bodner – Hot Tub (Hell Comes to Hollywood II) (Big Time Books)
Patrick Freivald – Trigger Warning (Demonic Visions Book 4) (Chris Robertson)
Sydney Leigh – Baby’s Breath (Bugs: Tales That Slither, Creep, and Crawl) (Great Old Ones Publishing)
Usman T. Malik – The Vaporization Enthalpy of a Peculiar Pakistani Family (Qualia Nous) (Written Backwards)
Alessandro Manzetti – Nature’s Oddities (The Shaman: And Other Shadows) (self-published)
Rena Mason – Ruminations (Qualia Nous) (Written Backwards)
John Palisano – Splinterette (Widowmakers: A Benefit Anthology of Dark Fiction)
Sayuri Ueda – The Street of Fruiting Bodies (Phantasm Japan) (Haikasoru, an imprint of VIZ Media, LLC)
Genevieve Valentine – A Dweller in Amenty (Nightmare Magazine, March 2014) (Nightmare)
Damien Angelica Walters – The Floating Girls: A Documentary (Jamais Vu, Issue Three) (Post Mortem Press)

Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection
Michael Bailey – Inkblots and Blood Spots (Villipede Publications)
Stephen Graham Jones – After the People Lights Have Gone Off (Dark House Press)
John R. Little – Little by Little (Bad Moon Books)
Helen Marshall – Gifts for the One Who Comes After (ChiZine Publications)
David Sakmyster – Escape Plans (Wordfire Press)
Terrence Scott – The Madeleine Wheel: Playing with Spiders (Amazon)
Lucy Snyder – Soft Apocalypses (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
Robin Spriggs – The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom (Anomalous Books)
John F.D. Taff – The End In All Beginnings (Grey Matter Press)
Alexander Zelenyj – Songs for the Lost (Eibonvale Press)

Superior Achievement in an Anthology
John Joseph Adams and Hugh Howey – The End Is Nigh (Broad Reach Publishing)
Michael Bailey – Qualia Nous (Written Backwards)
Jason V. Brock – A Darke Phantastique  (Cycatrix Press)
Ellen Datlow – Fearful Symmetries (ChiZine Publications)
Kate Jonez – Halloween Tales (Omnium Gatherum)
Eric Miller – Hell Comes to Hollywood II (Big Time Books)
Chuck Palahniuk, Richard Thomas, and Dennis Widmyer – Burnt Tongues (Medallion Press)
Brian M. Sammons – The Dark Rites of Cthulhu (April Moon Books)
Brett J. Talley – Limbus, Inc., Book II (JournalStone)
Terry M. West – Journals of Horror: Found Fiction (Pleasant Storm Entertainment)

Superior Achievement in a Screenplay
Scott M. Gimple – The Walking Dead: The Grove, episode 4:14 (AMC)
James Hawes – Penny Dreadful: Possession (Desert Wolf Productions/Neal Street Productions)
Jennifer Kent – The Babadook (Causeway Films)
Alex Kurtzman and Mark Goffman – Sleepy Hollow: “Bad Blood” (Sketch Films/K/O Paper Products/20th Century Fox Television)
John Logan – Penny Dreadful: Séance (Desert Wolf Productions/Neal Street Productions)
Greg Mclean and Aaron Sterns – Wolf Creek 2 (Emu Creek Pictures)
Stephen Moffat – Doctor Who: Listen (British Broadcasting Corporation)
Cameron Porsendah – Helix: Pilot (Tall Ship Productions/Kaji Productions/Muse Entertainment/Lynda Obst Productions/in association with Sony Pictures Television)
Jack Thomas Smith –Infliction (Fox Trail Productions)
James Wong – American Horror Story: Coven: “The Magical Delights of Stevie Nicks” (FX Network)

Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction
Massimo Berruti, S.T. Joshi, and Sam Gafford – William Hope Hodgson: Voices from the Borderland (Hippocampus Press)
Jason V. Brock – Disorders of Magnitude (Rowman & Littlefield)
Hayley Campbell – The Art of Neil Gaiman (HarperCollins Publishers)
S.T. Joshi – Lovecraft and A World in Transition (Hippocampus Press)
Leslie S. Klinger – The New Annotated H.P. Lovecraft (Liveright Publishing Corp., a division of W.W. Norton & Co.)
Joe Mynhardt and Emma Audsley – Horror 101: The Way Forward (Crystal Lake Publishing)
Robert Damon Schneck – Mrs. Wakeman vs. the Antichrist (Tarcher/Penguin)
Lucy Snyder – Shooting Yourself in the Head For Fun and Profit: A Writer’s Survival Guide (Post Mortem Press)
Tom Weaver, David Schecter, and Steve Kronenberg – The Creature Chronicles: Exploring the Black Lagoon Trilogy (McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers)

Superior Achievement in a Poetry Collection
Robert Payne Cabeen – Fearworms: Selected Poems (Fanboy Comics)
G.O. Clark – Gravedigger’s Dance (Dark Renaissance Books)
David E. Cowen – The Madness of Empty Spaces (Weasel Press)
Corrinne De Winter and Alessandro Manzetti – Venus Intervention (Kipple Officina Libraria)
Wade German – Dreams from the Black Nebula (Hippocampus Press)
Tom Piccirilli – Forgiving Judas (Crossroad Press)
Michelle Scalise – The Manufacturer of Sorrow (Eldritch Press)
Marge Simon and Mary Turzillo – Sweet Poison (Dark Renaissance Books)
Tiffany Tang – Creepy Little Death Poems (Dreality Press)
Stephanie Wytovich – Mourning Jewelry (Raw Dog Screaming Press)


2013 Bram Stoker awards® Final Ballot announced

I’d like to congratulate all of these fantastic authors on making the final ballot for the 2013 Bram Stoker Awards®. There is some incredible work on the ballot this year. I wish you all much success in the final voting.

Superior Achievement in a Novel

  • Joe Hill – NOS4A2 (William Morrow)
  • Stephen King – Doctor Sleep (Scribner)
  • Lisa Morton – Malediction (Evil Jester Press)
  • Sarah Pinborough and F. Paul Wilson – A Necessary End (Thunderstorm/Maelstrom Press)
  • Christopher Rice – The Heavens Rise (Gallery Books)

Superior Achievement in a First Novel

  • Kate Jonez – Candy House (Evil Jester Press)
  • John Mantooth – The Year of the Storm (Berkley Trade)
  • Rena Mason – The Evolutionist (Nightscape Press)
  • Jonathan Moore – Redheads (Samhain Publishing)
  • Royce Prouty – Stoker’s Manuscript (G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel

  • Patrick Freivald – Special Dead (JournalStone)
  • Kami Garcia – Unbreakable (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers)
  • Geoffrey Girard – Project Cain (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers)
  • Joe McKinney – Dog Days (JournalStone)
  • Cat Winters – In the Shadow of Blackbirds (Harry N. Abrams)

Superior Achievement in a Graphic Novel

  • Ed Brubaker – Fatale Book Three: West of Hell (Image Comics)
  • Caitlin R. Kiernan – Alabaster: Wolves (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Brandon Seifert – Witch Doctor, Vol. 2: Mal Practice (Image Comics)
  • Cameron Stewart – Sin Titulo (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Paul Tobin – Colder (Dark Horse Comics)

Superior Achievement in Long Fiction

  • Dale Bailey – “The Bluehole” (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, May/June 2013)
  • Gary Braunbeck – “The Great Pity” (Chiral Mad 2, Written Backwards)
  • Benjamin K. Ethridge – “The Slaughter Man” (Limbus, Inc., JournalStone)
  • Gregory Frost – “No Others Are Genuine” (Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct./Nov. 2013)
  • Greg F. Gifune – House of Rain (DarkFuse)
  • Rena Mason – East End Girls (JournalStone)

Superior Achievement in Short Fiction

  • Michael Bailey – “Primal Tongue” (Zippered Flesh 2, Smart Rhino Publications)
  • Patrick Freivald – “Snapshot” (Blood & Roses, Scarlett River Press)
  • David Gerrold – “Night Train to Paris” (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Jan./Feb. 2013)
  • Lisa Mannetti – “The Hunger Artist” (Zippered Flesh 2, Smart Rhino Publications)
  • John Palisano – “The Geminis” (Chiral Mad 2, Written Backwards)
  • Michael Reaves – “Code 666” (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, March/April 2013)

Superior Achievement in a Screenplay

  • Fabien Adda and Fabrice Gobert – The Returned: “The Horde” (Ramaco Media I, Castelao Pictures)
  • Brad Falchuk – American Horror Story: Asylum: “Spilt Milk” (Brad Falchuk Teley-Vision, Ryan Murphy Productions)
  • Bryan Fuller – Hannibal: “Apéritif” (Dino De Laurentiis Company, Living Dead Guy Productions, AXN: Original X Production, Gaumont International Television)
  • Daniel Knauf – Dracula: “A Whiff of Sulfur” (Flame Ventures, Playground, Universal Television, Carnival Films)
  • Glen Mazzara – The Walking Dead: “Welcome to the Tombs” (AMC TV)

Superior Achievement in an Anthology

  • R.J. Cavender and Boyd E. Harris (ed.) – Horror Library: Volume 5 (Cutting Block Press)
  • Eric J. Guignard (ed.) – After Death… (Dark Moon Books)
  • Michael Knost and Nancy Eden Siegel (ed.) – Barbers & Beauties (Hummingbird House Press)
  • Joseph S. Pulver, Sr. (ed.) – The Grimscribe’s Puppets (Miskatonic River Press)
  • Anthony Rivera and Sharon Lawson (ed.) – Dark Visions: A Collection of Modern Horror, Volume One (Grey Matter Press)

Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection
blue_lady_web

  • Nathan Ballingrud – North American Lake Monsters: Stories (Small Beer Press)
  • Laird Barron – The Beautiful Thing That Awaits Us All and Other Stories (Night Shade Books)
  • James Dorr – The Tears of Isis (Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing)
  • Caitlin R. Kiernan – The Ape’s Wife and Other Stories (Subterranean)
  • Gene O’Neill – Dance of the Blue Lady (Bad Moon Books)
  • S. P. Somtow – Bible Stories for Secular Humanists (Diplodocus Press)

Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction

  • Barbara Brodman and James E. Doan (ed.) – Images of the Modern Vampire: The Hip and the Atavistic (Fairleigh Dickinson)
  • Gary William Crawford (ed.) – Ramsey Campbell: Critical Essays on the Modern Master of Horror (Scarecrow Press)
  • William F. Nolan – Nolan on Bradbury: Sixty Years of Writing about the Master of Science Fiction (Hippocampus Press)
  • Jarkko Toikkanen – The Intermedial Experience of Horror: Suspended Failures (Palgrave Macmillan)
  • Robert H. Waugh (ed.) – Lovecraft and Influence: His Predecessors and Successors (Scarecrow Press)

Superior Achievement in a Poetry Collection
sex_lives_monsters

  • Bruce Boston – Dark Roads: Selected Long Poems 1971-2012 (Dark Renaissance Books)
  • Helen Marshall – The Sex Lives of Monsters (Kelp Queen Press)
  • Marge Simon and Sandy DeLuca – Dangerous Dreams (Elektrik Milk Bath Press)
  • Marge Simon, Rain Graves, Charlee Jacob, and Linda Addison – Four Elements (Bad Moon Books/Evil Jester Press)
  • Stephanie M. Wytovich – Hysteria: A Collection of Madness (Raw Dog Screaming Press)

Robert Essig: The Genesis of People of the Ethereal Realm – Part Two

Rob pic 2

All stories have a genesis, a birthing into the world from writers’ minds, through their fingertips and into their computer (or onto paper for those who still write first drafts longhand).  In part one of this essay I wrote about how I came up with the idea for my novel People of the Ethereal Realm and a bit about the writing process.  If you haven’t done so already, you can read part one at Craig Saunders’ blog. I’ll be here waiting for you when you’re finished.

People of the Ethereal Realm was published as my second novel, however it was the first novel I’d written.  That’s not to say that I didn’t have opportunities for the book to be published before Post Mortem Press released it in July.  Bringing this book into the world began with several years of false alarms and disappointments that taught me a lot about the small press in the process.

So, after selling a number of short stories, I’d written my first novel, and I couldn’t have been more proud of myself.  I hit the Web and searched for viable publishers to send my manuscript.  This was before Post Mortem Press had opened for business, so they weren’t yet on my radar.  I’d sent the manuscript to a number of publishers, some of whom I had short stories published with, others with a sparkling clean reputation, and yet others I had little knowledge of.  The first thing I learned (something I should have learned from submitting short stories) was that research, particularly concerning unknown publishers, is a must.  I also learned to go with my gut, to listen to my heart. To ignore intuition is a fool’s game.

people of the ethereal realm cover

So I had several poles in the water and I got a bite from a publisher—whose name will remain concealed—that I had no prior experience with. They emailed a contract that could have been an offer on a new house it was so big. I read every word of it, mostly the same jargon typical of a publishing contract.  They offered a twenty-five dollar advance, and then later in the contract I was given the option to have my advance applied to the cost of the twenty books I was required to purchase at full price within a certain number of days after publication.

Let that sink in for a second.  How much is the average price for a trade paperback?  Somewhere around fifteen dollars give or take a buck.

I was shocked, so I ran a Google search (yep, should have done that first!), and found a great deal of bitching and complaining about this publisher.  They were a pay-to-play gig, and from what I read, they didn’t put much force behind their horror titles, as evidenced on their website where there were plenty of thriller and romance but no horror novels to be seen.  This is what I mean about following intuition.  That had struck me as strange from the get go.

Needless to say, I politely rejected the contract and waited for bites from the other poles I had in the great pond of small press publishing.

Soon enough another publisher emailed me with an acceptance letter, contract to follow.  The contract never showed up and they were unresponsive to my emails. As of this writing, they seemed to have fallen off the face of the planet. Dodged a bullet there, I suppose.

I was beginning to think that this book was destined for disaster.

Next I sent the manuscript to Twisted Library Press.  I’d had many a story published in their anthologies and even edited two of them (was taking submissions for a third anthology at the time).  I could see the signs on the wall, beginning with so many anthology submission calls that there would be no way for a publisher to possibly follow through with each one.  I also saw that there was what seemed like an equal number of novels to be published by an ever-growing list of imprints.  But still I submitted my novel when I should have taken a moment to realize what was very clear.

The book sat in limbo for a year.  The cover had been designed, it had gone through an editing process, and I had even started promoting it.  The contract expired and soon after Twisted Library Press became defunct.

So People of the Ethereal Realm was destined for disaster … or maybe not.

During the period of time that I had edited anthologies for Twisted Library, I discovered a brand new publisher: Post Mortem Press.  I sent Eric Beebe a story and it was published in their debut anthology Uncanny Allegories.  My novella “Cemetery Tour” was included in the PMP release The Road to Hell, as well as a few more shorts in other anthologies.

Having been with PMP from the beginning, I’d watched them grow. It was all the research I needed.  In Eric Beebe I found a trusting publisher and a man of determination and dedication.  I submitted my manuscript, and when I received the acceptance letter, I knew that People of the Ethereal Realm was finally destined for something good.

I learned a lot during the process of getting this book published, but I am no fool and realize that there is so much more to be learned in the strange and sometimes discouraging world of publishing.

On a final note, I would like to thank Ken Cain for being gracious enough to allow me the use of his blog.  I appreciate it, man!

Find more about Robert on his website: https://robertessig.blogspot.com or on Facebook.
Other books by Robert on Amazon.

The Next Big Thing

I was tagged for the Next Big Thing promotional blog project by the talented Cynthia Pelayo, whose upcoming book Santa Muerte is worth the read. Check this book out very soon from Post Mortem Press:

The Ten Interview Questions for the Next Big Thing:

Q: What is your working title of your book?
A: CONSTRUCT

Q: Where did the idea come from for the book?
A: This idea perhaps arose from one night spent staring at one of those plastic Easter eggs for too long. It sounds odd, but when you read the story it will make sense.

Q: What genre does your book fall under?
This one will be primarily a science fiction/horror mix, perhaps with a dash of fantasy for seasoning.

Q: Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?
A: You know, I’ve heard a lot of authors who say they have an actor in mind when they create their characters, but my head doesn’t work that way. I think what I see in my mind is more of a conglomeration of people. But if I had to choose, I think I might go with whoever is popular at the moment. Popularity reaps ticket sales.

Q: What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?
A: When you begin this book, you will think it another zombie book and likely expect the normal run of the mill obstacles, but not everything is always as it seems and this is not a book about zombies.

Q: Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?
A: I received some interest from an agent when this story was only a few thousands words, so I may try my hand at that.

Q: How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?
A: I’m halfway through now, but I’ve taken a bit of a hiatus to focus on the third book in THE SAGA OF I and THE DEAD CIVIL WAR. Plus, I’ve been reworking a bunch of shorts for my next collection, which I plan to shop around a bit. I’m sort of clearing the deck to finish this one up, which will likely happen in the early half of 2013. In total, that might end up being a handful of months.

Q: What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?
A: That is a really tough one. I worked really hard at trying to do something different with this one. And while I know that is no easy task, I do think I’ve got something with this story. The first chapter in this book is really misleading and people will think it is all about zombies. Of course they will, because I did when I started to write it. But sometimes your characters take over and they reveal that one little detail, the secret that transforms the story into something completely different. So I’m not sure really, but I suppose I’m fond of THE STAND by Stephen King, so maybe a slight taste of that.

Q: Who or what inspired you to write this book?
A: Too many sleepless nights full of bad dreams, waking up unable to breathe and trying to make the best of it. I write from my heart about my own fears and while my worries may not encompass something as outrageous as this story, elements of those fears are what comprise much of the subplots.

Q: What else about your book might piqué the reader’s interest
A: Hell, if I don’t have you at “This is not a zombie book” when it clearly appears that it is, then I’m not sure what more I can offer you. When you see this book, try it. You just might like it.

I’m a little late to this game and I am supposed to tag five authors to make a similar post. So if you are reading this and would like to take part, then contact me and I will tag you in this post.

~Kenneth W. Cain


Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Lydia Peever


A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – LYDIA PEEVER

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A: I grew up in a moody little town reading a lot of dark fiction. That tends to dictate my personality today as well as how and what I write. As far as genre, I would like to say I write horror purely and simply, yet I do have a literary tone. As bad as I want to write a hot slasher that leaps off the page I get caught up in the bloody little details. The things that really make humans tick.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: Lately, I have been planning a nice launch pad for short horror in a ‘zine format. ‘Single Tale’ will be a series of evil and horrific stories geared toward a very adult audience. Eventually, I also hope to publish a collection of my short horror under an anagram – because I adore anagrams – that has an audio book styled accompaniment. The prototypes of these projects are being tweaked. Over the winter of 2012 I will be doing a lot of planning with Hora Morior as well and hoping to bring a lot of others terrifyingly dark art out through them. Also, the sequel to Nightface. That is the biggest thing in my life right now. Bigger than eating food and getting proper sleep!

Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: Short fiction is a lot like a perfect dinner date. It starts, it’s nice, it’s over, you smile and go home. Everyone is happy and it is something nice to think about for a few days. Long fiction is… different. Long fiction is that distressingly hot crush. The toxic relationship that just can’t quit. It can go on for years and tear your mind apart. You love every other minute, but hate the next one. No matter how many short-fiction dinner-dates you go on, this is what is tattooed behind your eyes and thrumming within the beat of every song. I enjoy both and prefer to do them both on a regular basis. Sometimes on the same day.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A: It is a toss up, really, but I would have to say Turner. Turner is a young man in my short story entitled ‘Thicker Than’ published by West Pigeon Press in the ‘For When The Veil Drops’ anthology. In some ways, he is a male version of me on a bad day even though he is based on someone I used to know. So dark, so sad, everyone can relate to that angst that leaves you nearly mute and a true ticking time bomb. I also like The Farmer in Nightface a lot since he does not really fit into any horror envelope neatly.

Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A: A tough question! I could list many authors and have people guess at who really influences me, but the truth is I am influenced by life. Non-fiction. The news. People I meet. That is the huge influence, and my own ‘extremely regular’ life. I read a lot so there is truly list of hundreds of authors that could be here but; Richard Laymon and Edward Lee to relax – a clense palate for reality as it were. Kathe Koja, Clive Barker, Chuck Palahniuk and Otsuichi may influence my style – but I did grow up on a steady diet of Stephen King novels and encyclopedias.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors?

A: Find your groove, and the minute it gets slippery, slide into another one. Test yourself and write longhand. Nothing beats writing out tens of thousands of words with a pen on paper. Read your stuff aloud. Get lost in your words so you can see them from the inside, and how they really work. Then sell it.

Q: What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: My family and friends from home have been a huge support, for sure. Associates at school and partners in business help as well, as I have had several careers in my short time. The musicians and artists I know are a constant boon and huge inspiration as well as those goth, kink, and fellow writer types I adore. Attending any horror-related event always helps and is a great way to blow off steam too. Setbacks? The only setback is not having as many hours in a day as I would like to just f’n write.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Lydia Peever is a…”

A: … typical girl.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: I do horror-related work for Ottawa Horror and Hora Morior so please check them out. Also, I get a lot of support from Patron Saint of Plagues – phenomenal horror rock – designed their current website and helped produce a video for ‘Things Arn’t What They Seem’ [sic]. Along with other authors, I get a lot of inspiration from musicians, artists and photographers.

http://nightface.ca/
http://www.facebook.com/Nightface
http://typicallydia.com/
http://www.ottawahorror.com/
http://horamorior.com/
http://www.patronsaintofplagues.com/

Bio: 
Lydia Peever is a journalist and horror author living in Ottawa. With articles in some newspapers and magazines, she is currently working on the sequel to her violent vampire novel, Nightface.

With too many hobbies and diverse interests, you may find her researching genealogy in a dusty library, profiling artists for ottawahorror.com, or taking photos at a punk show. By day, she haunts trendy cafés, tends poison flowerbeds, and photographs roadkill.

 

BUY LYDIA’S STORIES DIRECTLY FROM AMAZON BY CLICKING ON ANY IMAGE BELOW:


Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Brian Dobbins

A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – BRIAN DOBBINS

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A:  I tend to be genre challenged. At the moment I have two novels out. One is a western entitled Corryville. The other is a fantasy/adventure that sports the ambitious title Jasmine’s Tale: Darkness And Light, and involves a witch and her private detective husband, which in itself mixes genres. What both novels have in common are the elements that I consider essential to storytelling. Character development is probably top of the list; readers don’t care about characters that they can’t relate to. A story should be well-paced, which, for me, translates into fast-paced. Believability is crucial. No matter how fanciful the concept, the plot and motivations of the characters must make sense. I also like to sprinkle my stories with liberal dashes of historical references, so research is very important. Dialogue is also important… plus I love writing it.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: Both novels have sequels in the works. Hopefully the sequels will have sequels, too.

Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: I’ll read anything from graphic novels (which I still occasionally refer to as comic books), magazine articles and poetry to short stories and novels.Some of those catagories, such as articles and short stories, often have set limits. A novel is a different kind of animal. I think a novel determines its own length. I can’t concentrate on writing a story if I’m preoccupied with a target word count that I want to hit. My books tend to be fast-paced and concise, simply by virtue of my writing style and what I like as a reader.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A:  I’m not sure I can answer that. That’s a little like asking a parent which child they prefer. I like most of the characters I’ve created, for one reason or another. In Jasmine’s Tale, for instance, I really like Sam. He’s not always sure what’s going on, as he’s often pitted against powerful witches who can put the whammy on him. But he tries hard and usually gets the job done. On the other hand, McGowen, the antagonist in the story, serves as the perfect foil for Jasmine and her friends. The same dilemma presents itself in Corryville. I really like Wade Loveless and Moses White, the two determined and seasoned marshals, but Mike Kenney is a pretty fair villain. It’s really tough to pick favorites, so I usually don’t try.

Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A:  I just love to read. I grew up devouring sci-fi and spooky stuff, but I’ve spent the last few years kind of obsessed with both crime thrillers and westerns. Basically I’ll read just about anything. Except romance novels, and that’s all I have to say about that subject.

A lot of writers have influenced me…William Goldman, Robert B. Parker, Dashiell Hammett, H.G. Wells, Steven King and Larry McMurtry to name just a few.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors? What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: Write. Read. Don’t be afraid to put something on paper just because you don’t think someone won’t like it. Know your subject matter. If you don’t know it, research it. Readers of genre fiction, in particular, know their stuff, so you’d better know it, too. Remember to show your characters’ motivations for their actions. A story has to make sense, even when it doesn’t.

Exposure is a constant battle. Publishing has been changing dramatically for the last few years, so promotional options have as well. The internet is now probably the best tool going for the little-known writer, but traditional efforts like book signings, trade shows, and footwork still have their place. A book is a product. Sell it.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Brian Dobbins is a…”

A: … guy who doesn’t know how to describe himself.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: Buy my books. Baby needs a new pair of shoes.

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Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Ginny Gilroy

A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – GINNY GILROY

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A:  I write speculative fiction about extraordinary women. My style can best be described as concise. I often struggle with commas and adjectives, often having not enough of either. In writing as in life I appreciate clarity and directness. Unfortunately, that can sometimes come across as abrupt.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: I’m working on my next novel, Jane Gray. It’s a science fiction book based on a short story, The Secret Life of Jane Gray,  published in the Barren Worlds anthology.

Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: I can’t choose one over the other. Novels give a writer a great deal of space to create a universe. That’s an advantage in writing science fiction. On the other hand I like writing short stories because they are by nature concise.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A:  It’s a toss up between Constance and Jane. Constance is in her way very pure. She has an extraordinary ability to focus. Her life is very ordered and carefully arranged.  When her world turns up side down, she doesn’t compromise her identity.  Jane Gray on the other hand is adaptable and manipulative. Being a rebel corporate executive, she’s a kind of Cyber punk antiheroine.

Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A:  I’ll read everything and anything. One of the reasons I’m so fond of my kindle is because it allows “sampling.” It’s opened me up to books I never would have put my money down to purchase.

Writers I admire, who have influenced my work, are Shirley Jackson, and Frank Herbert. Whenever I get stuck in my prose, I’ll pick up one of their books and just read. Their novels set the bar for my own work.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors? What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: Write every day. There is no other way. There are no deal breakers. I’ve taken breaks from writing to “reset” but always come back.

Exposure is an issue I struggle with on many levels. Pinterest seems to work for me. It’s  personal but not too personal, and concise. I enjoy the challenge of coming up with  interesting captions.  We’ll see if it leads to sales. Twitter did not work for me at all.  I post to Facebook, but it takes a lot of time and effort to really master. Unfortunately in my world both are in short supply.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Ginny Gilroy is a .”

A: Ginny Gilroy is a work in progress.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: Believe me you don’t want to start me on a rant. My website is ginnygilroy.com I update it every quarter or so.

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