Robert Essig: The Genesis of People of the Ethereal Realm – Part Two

Rob pic 2

All stories have a genesis, a birthing into the world from writers’ minds, through their fingertips and into their computer (or onto paper for those who still write first drafts longhand).  In part one of this essay I wrote about how I came up with the idea for my novel People of the Ethereal Realm and a bit about the writing process.  If you haven’t done so already, you can read part one at Craig Saunders’ blog. I’ll be here waiting for you when you’re finished.

People of the Ethereal Realm was published as my second novel, however it was the first novel I’d written.  That’s not to say that I didn’t have opportunities for the book to be published before Post Mortem Press released it in July.  Bringing this book into the world began with several years of false alarms and disappointments that taught me a lot about the small press in the process.

So, after selling a number of short stories, I’d written my first novel, and I couldn’t have been more proud of myself.  I hit the Web and searched for viable publishers to send my manuscript.  This was before Post Mortem Press had opened for business, so they weren’t yet on my radar.  I’d sent the manuscript to a number of publishers, some of whom I had short stories published with, others with a sparkling clean reputation, and yet others I had little knowledge of.  The first thing I learned (something I should have learned from submitting short stories) was that research, particularly concerning unknown publishers, is a must.  I also learned to go with my gut, to listen to my heart. To ignore intuition is a fool’s game.

people of the ethereal realm cover

So I had several poles in the water and I got a bite from a publisher—whose name will remain concealed—that I had no prior experience with. They emailed a contract that could have been an offer on a new house it was so big. I read every word of it, mostly the same jargon typical of a publishing contract.  They offered a twenty-five dollar advance, and then later in the contract I was given the option to have my advance applied to the cost of the twenty books I was required to purchase at full price within a certain number of days after publication.

Let that sink in for a second.  How much is the average price for a trade paperback?  Somewhere around fifteen dollars give or take a buck.

I was shocked, so I ran a Google search (yep, should have done that first!), and found a great deal of bitching and complaining about this publisher.  They were a pay-to-play gig, and from what I read, they didn’t put much force behind their horror titles, as evidenced on their website where there were plenty of thriller and romance but no horror novels to be seen.  This is what I mean about following intuition.  That had struck me as strange from the get go.

Needless to say, I politely rejected the contract and waited for bites from the other poles I had in the great pond of small press publishing.

Soon enough another publisher emailed me with an acceptance letter, contract to follow.  The contract never showed up and they were unresponsive to my emails. As of this writing, they seemed to have fallen off the face of the planet. Dodged a bullet there, I suppose.

I was beginning to think that this book was destined for disaster.

Next I sent the manuscript to Twisted Library Press.  I’d had many a story published in their anthologies and even edited two of them (was taking submissions for a third anthology at the time).  I could see the signs on the wall, beginning with so many anthology submission calls that there would be no way for a publisher to possibly follow through with each one.  I also saw that there was what seemed like an equal number of novels to be published by an ever-growing list of imprints.  But still I submitted my novel when I should have taken a moment to realize what was very clear.

The book sat in limbo for a year.  The cover had been designed, it had gone through an editing process, and I had even started promoting it.  The contract expired and soon after Twisted Library Press became defunct.

So People of the Ethereal Realm was destined for disaster … or maybe not.

During the period of time that I had edited anthologies for Twisted Library, I discovered a brand new publisher: Post Mortem Press.  I sent Eric Beebe a story and it was published in their debut anthology Uncanny Allegories.  My novella “Cemetery Tour” was included in the PMP release The Road to Hell, as well as a few more shorts in other anthologies.

Having been with PMP from the beginning, I’d watched them grow. It was all the research I needed.  In Eric Beebe I found a trusting publisher and a man of determination and dedication.  I submitted my manuscript, and when I received the acceptance letter, I knew that People of the Ethereal Realm was finally destined for something good.

I learned a lot during the process of getting this book published, but I am no fool and realize that there is so much more to be learned in the strange and sometimes discouraging world of publishing.

On a final note, I would like to thank Ken Cain for being gracious enough to allow me the use of his blog.  I appreciate it, man!

Find more about Robert on his website: https://robertessig.blogspot.com or on Facebook.
Other books by Robert on Amazon.

Fresh Cut Tales

Fresh Cut Tales tagline:
Fans of classic TV series like The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, One Step Beyond, or any similar dark fiction or paranormal series will enjoy this collection of psychological speculative fiction where not everything is always what it seems.

Where to read this book:

Distressed Press

Blurbs:
“Solid combination from a writer to watch.” — Mort Castle, Bram Stoker Award winning author of New Moon on the Water

“Enthralling, eclectic collection of unputdownable speculative fiction.” — Benjamin Kane Ethridge, Bram Stoker Award winning author of Black & Orange and Bottled Abyss

“Expect the unexpected in this macabre and thoroughly entertaining collection.” — Mike Davis, The Lovecraft Ezine

“Twisted tales that are guaranteed to keep you up at night.” — Michael McCarty, author of I Kissed a Ghoul

From reviews:
“I truly enjoyed this wonderful collection of dark fantasy/horror stories.  Each have their own unique storyline and the outcome is always surprising, and some will make you think.  I will be on the hunt for more from this author.” — The Holleman Household

“The author has a vivid imagination and some of his plots are quite good…” — Don D’Ammassa

“A solid collection for horror aficionados with plenty of variety.” — Trent Walters 

Pack Animals

Pack Animals tagline:
Like a mashup between Blade, The Walking Dead, and Resident Evil.

Where to read this book:

Distressed Press

Post Mortem Press

Out of Print

Post Mortem Press (Original release)

Out of Print

Blurbs:
“Think Patrick Henry goes to Zombieland” — Joe McKinney, author of Mutated and Inheritance

The Next Big Thing

I was tagged for the Next Big Thing promotional blog project by the talented Cynthia Pelayo, whose upcoming book Santa Muerte is worth the read. Check this book out very soon from Post Mortem Press:

The Ten Interview Questions for the Next Big Thing:

Q: What is your working title of your book?
A: CONSTRUCT

Q: Where did the idea come from for the book?
A: This idea perhaps arose from one night spent staring at one of those plastic Easter eggs for too long. It sounds odd, but when you read the story it will make sense.

Q: What genre does your book fall under?
This one will be primarily a science fiction/horror mix, perhaps with a dash of fantasy for seasoning.

Q: Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?
A: You know, I’ve heard a lot of authors who say they have an actor in mind when they create their characters, but my head doesn’t work that way. I think what I see in my mind is more of a conglomeration of people. But if I had to choose, I think I might go with whoever is popular at the moment. Popularity reaps ticket sales.

Q: What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?
A: When you begin this book, you will think it another zombie book and likely expect the normal run of the mill obstacles, but not everything is always as it seems and this is not a book about zombies.

Q: Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?
A: I received some interest from an agent when this story was only a few thousands words, so I may try my hand at that.

Q: How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?
A: I’m halfway through now, but I’ve taken a bit of a hiatus to focus on the third book in THE SAGA OF I and THE DEAD CIVIL WAR. Plus, I’ve been reworking a bunch of shorts for my next collection, which I plan to shop around a bit. I’m sort of clearing the deck to finish this one up, which will likely happen in the early half of 2013. In total, that might end up being a handful of months.

Q: What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?
A: That is a really tough one. I worked really hard at trying to do something different with this one. And while I know that is no easy task, I do think I’ve got something with this story. The first chapter in this book is really misleading and people will think it is all about zombies. Of course they will, because I did when I started to write it. But sometimes your characters take over and they reveal that one little detail, the secret that transforms the story into something completely different. So I’m not sure really, but I suppose I’m fond of THE STAND by Stephen King, so maybe a slight taste of that.

Q: Who or what inspired you to write this book?
A: Too many sleepless nights full of bad dreams, waking up unable to breathe and trying to make the best of it. I write from my heart about my own fears and while my worries may not encompass something as outrageous as this story, elements of those fears are what comprise much of the subplots.

Q: What else about your book might piqué the reader’s interest
A: Hell, if I don’t have you at “This is not a zombie book” when it clearly appears that it is, then I’m not sure what more I can offer you. When you see this book, try it. You just might like it.

I’m a little late to this game and I am supposed to tag five authors to make a similar post. So if you are reading this and would like to take part, then contact me and I will tag you in this post.

~Kenneth W. Cain

Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Lydia Peever


A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – LYDIA PEEVER

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A: I grew up in a moody little town reading a lot of dark fiction. That tends to dictate my personality today as well as how and what I write. As far as genre, I would like to say I write horror purely and simply, yet I do have a literary tone. As bad as I want to write a hot slasher that leaps off the page I get caught up in the bloody little details. The things that really make humans tick.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: Lately, I have been planning a nice launch pad for short horror in a ‘zine format. ‘Single Tale’ will be a series of evil and horrific stories geared toward a very adult audience. Eventually, I also hope to publish a collection of my short horror under an anagram – because I adore anagrams – that has an audio book styled accompaniment. The prototypes of these projects are being tweaked. Over the winter of 2012 I will be doing a lot of planning with Hora Morior as well and hoping to bring a lot of others terrifyingly dark art out through them. Also, the sequel to Nightface. That is the biggest thing in my life right now. Bigger than eating food and getting proper sleep!

Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: Short fiction is a lot like a perfect dinner date. It starts, it’s nice, it’s over, you smile and go home. Everyone is happy and it is something nice to think about for a few days. Long fiction is… different. Long fiction is that distressingly hot crush. The toxic relationship that just can’t quit. It can go on for years and tear your mind apart. You love every other minute, but hate the next one. No matter how many short-fiction dinner-dates you go on, this is what is tattooed behind your eyes and thrumming within the beat of every song. I enjoy both and prefer to do them both on a regular basis. Sometimes on the same day.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A: It is a toss up, really, but I would have to say Turner. Turner is a young man in my short story entitled ‘Thicker Than’ published by West Pigeon Press in the ‘For When The Veil Drops’ anthology. In some ways, he is a male version of me on a bad day even though he is based on someone I used to know. So dark, so sad, everyone can relate to that angst that leaves you nearly mute and a true ticking time bomb. I also like The Farmer in Nightface a lot since he does not really fit into any horror envelope neatly.

Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A: A tough question! I could list many authors and have people guess at who really influences me, but the truth is I am influenced by life. Non-fiction. The news. People I meet. That is the huge influence, and my own ‘extremely regular’ life. I read a lot so there is truly list of hundreds of authors that could be here but; Richard Laymon and Edward Lee to relax – a clense palate for reality as it were. Kathe Koja, Clive Barker, Chuck Palahniuk and Otsuichi may influence my style – but I did grow up on a steady diet of Stephen King novels and encyclopedias.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors?

A: Find your groove, and the minute it gets slippery, slide into another one. Test yourself and write longhand. Nothing beats writing out tens of thousands of words with a pen on paper. Read your stuff aloud. Get lost in your words so you can see them from the inside, and how they really work. Then sell it.

Q: What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: My family and friends from home have been a huge support, for sure. Associates at school and partners in business help as well, as I have had several careers in my short time. The musicians and artists I know are a constant boon and huge inspiration as well as those goth, kink, and fellow writer types I adore. Attending any horror-related event always helps and is a great way to blow off steam too. Setbacks? The only setback is not having as many hours in a day as I would like to just f’n write.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Lydia Peever is a…”

A: … typical girl.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: I do horror-related work for Ottawa Horror and Hora Morior so please check them out. Also, I get a lot of support from Patron Saint of Plagues – phenomenal horror rock – designed their current website and helped produce a video for ‘Things Arn’t What They Seem’ [sic]. Along with other authors, I get a lot of inspiration from musicians, artists and photographers.

http://nightface.ca/
http://www.facebook.com/Nightface
http://typicallydia.com/
http://www.ottawahorror.com/
http://horamorior.com/
http://www.patronsaintofplagues.com/

Bio: 
Lydia Peever is a journalist and horror author living in Ottawa. With articles in some newspapers and magazines, she is currently working on the sequel to her violent vampire novel, Nightface.

With too many hobbies and diverse interests, you may find her researching genealogy in a dusty library, profiling artists for ottawahorror.com, or taking photos at a punk show. By day, she haunts trendy cafés, tends poison flowerbeds, and photographs roadkill.

 

BUY LYDIA’S STORIES DIRECTLY FROM AMAZON BY CLICKING ON ANY IMAGE BELOW:

Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Brian Dobbins

A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – BRIAN DOBBINS

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A:  I tend to be genre challenged. At the moment I have two novels out. One is a western entitled Corryville. The other is a fantasy/adventure that sports the ambitious title Jasmine’s Tale: Darkness And Light, and involves a witch and her private detective husband, which in itself mixes genres. What both novels have in common are the elements that I consider essential to storytelling. Character development is probably top of the list; readers don’t care about characters that they can’t relate to. A story should be well-paced, which, for me, translates into fast-paced. Believability is crucial. No matter how fanciful the concept, the plot and motivations of the characters must make sense. I also like to sprinkle my stories with liberal dashes of historical references, so research is very important. Dialogue is also important… plus I love writing it.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: Both novels have sequels in the works. Hopefully the sequels will have sequels, too.

Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: I’ll read anything from graphic novels (which I still occasionally refer to as comic books), magazine articles and poetry to short stories and novels.Some of those catagories, such as articles and short stories, often have set limits. A novel is a different kind of animal. I think a novel determines its own length. I can’t concentrate on writing a story if I’m preoccupied with a target word count that I want to hit. My books tend to be fast-paced and concise, simply by virtue of my writing style and what I like as a reader.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A:  I’m not sure I can answer that. That’s a little like asking a parent which child they prefer. I like most of the characters I’ve created, for one reason or another. In Jasmine’s Tale, for instance, I really like Sam. He’s not always sure what’s going on, as he’s often pitted against powerful witches who can put the whammy on him. But he tries hard and usually gets the job done. On the other hand, McGowen, the antagonist in the story, serves as the perfect foil for Jasmine and her friends. The same dilemma presents itself in Corryville. I really like Wade Loveless and Moses White, the two determined and seasoned marshals, but Mike Kenney is a pretty fair villain. It’s really tough to pick favorites, so I usually don’t try.

Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A:  I just love to read. I grew up devouring sci-fi and spooky stuff, but I’ve spent the last few years kind of obsessed with both crime thrillers and westerns. Basically I’ll read just about anything. Except romance novels, and that’s all I have to say about that subject.

A lot of writers have influenced me…William Goldman, Robert B. Parker, Dashiell Hammett, H.G. Wells, Steven King and Larry McMurtry to name just a few.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors? What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: Write. Read. Don’t be afraid to put something on paper just because you don’t think someone won’t like it. Know your subject matter. If you don’t know it, research it. Readers of genre fiction, in particular, know their stuff, so you’d better know it, too. Remember to show your characters’ motivations for their actions. A story has to make sense, even when it doesn’t.

Exposure is a constant battle. Publishing has been changing dramatically for the last few years, so promotional options have as well. The internet is now probably the best tool going for the little-known writer, but traditional efforts like book signings, trade shows, and footwork still have their place. A book is a product. Sell it.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Brian Dobbins is a…”

A: … guy who doesn’t know how to describe himself.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: Buy my books. Baby needs a new pair of shoes.

BUY BRIAN’S STORIES DIRECTLY FROM AMAZON BY CLICKING ON ANY IMAGE BELOW:

Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Ginny Gilroy

A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – GINNY GILROY

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A:  I write speculative fiction about extraordinary women. My style can best be described as concise. I often struggle with commas and adjectives, often having not enough of either. In writing as in life I appreciate clarity and directness. Unfortunately, that can sometimes come across as abrupt.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: I’m working on my next novel, Jane Gray. It’s a science fiction book based on a short story, The Secret Life of Jane Gray,  published in the Barren Worlds anthology.

Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: I can’t choose one over the other. Novels give a writer a great deal of space to create a universe. That’s an advantage in writing science fiction. On the other hand I like writing short stories because they are by nature concise.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A:  It’s a toss up between Constance and Jane. Constance is in her way very pure. She has an extraordinary ability to focus. Her life is very ordered and carefully arranged.  When her world turns up side down, she doesn’t compromise her identity.  Jane Gray on the other hand is adaptable and manipulative. Being a rebel corporate executive, she’s a kind of Cyber punk antiheroine.

Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A:  I’ll read everything and anything. One of the reasons I’m so fond of my kindle is because it allows “sampling.” It’s opened me up to books I never would have put my money down to purchase.

Writers I admire, who have influenced my work, are Shirley Jackson, and Frank Herbert. Whenever I get stuck in my prose, I’ll pick up one of their books and just read. Their novels set the bar for my own work.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors? What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: Write every day. There is no other way. There are no deal breakers. I’ve taken breaks from writing to “reset” but always come back.

Exposure is an issue I struggle with on many levels. Pinterest seems to work for me. It’s  personal but not too personal, and concise. I enjoy the challenge of coming up with  interesting captions.  We’ll see if it leads to sales. Twitter did not work for me at all.  I post to Facebook, but it takes a lot of time and effort to really master. Unfortunately in my world both are in short supply.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Ginny Gilroy is a .”

A: Ginny Gilroy is a work in progress.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: Believe me you don’t want to start me on a rant. My website is ginnygilroy.com I update it every quarter or so.

BUY GINNY’S STORIES DIRECTLY FROM AMAZON BY CLICKING ON ANY IMAGE BELOW:

How Marbles Roll: A Fun Story of Friendship

Other ebook sellers.

A creative story of friendship from the perspective of a marble that takes an unexpected journey through the neighborhood.

Witness a special friendship through the eyes of a marble. If you’ve ever played with marbles, you know how beautiful they can be. Aggie is a very special marble, thrown into adventure in the middle of a story about friendship, caring, giving and sacrifice, all depicted inside. It’s a colorful journey that will enhance the imagination of young readers. This book also includes setup and rules to play the game of marbles.

These Old Tales

These Old Tales tagline:
Fans of classic TV series like The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, One Step Beyond, or any similar dark fiction or paranormal series will enjoy this collection of psychological speculative fiction where not everything is always what it seems.

Where to read this book:

Distressed Press

2014 Nominee for Best Short Story Collection at eFestival of Words.

Blurbs:
“It’s always fun to stumble across a writer you haven’t read that has the ‘write stuff.'” — Gene O’Neill, The Burden of Indigo and Operation Rhinoceros Hornbill

From reviews:
“..keeps you guessing right until the end in his anthology These Old Tales – A Collection of Dark Fiction. With each new story, I kept trying to guess the ending, and each time I was wrong.” — Charnel House Reviews

“Cain’s unique eye for the macabre makes this collection more than worth it!” — To The Bone Reviews

“Cain’s skill as a writer is his ability to take mundane things most of us would never notice and turn them into true terror.” — DarkMedia

“The author deftly inhabits the minds of his protagonists, turning each piece into a sharp characterization that resonates long after it’s (usually) morbid conclusion.” — Goodreads Review

Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Georgina Morales

A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – GEORGINA MORALES

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A: My writing has two sides. On the one side there’s the horror/ supernatural stories I’ve always written and on the other there’s the stories about ordinary Joe’s in less than ordinary situations. These stories tend to be based in Dublin and have a comedy/ drama arc to them. My first novel, Pony Fleming being the best example of this and my new novel, The Barn due out this year, an example of the previous.

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A: I’ve been writing a lot of horror and I feel very comfortable with it but I’m already expanding my horizons writing mysteries and thrillers but always with a supernatural twist. At least for now. The other stories that get trapped on my mental strainer are plain straightforward romances. Go figure.

I won’t constrain myself to one genre but I will probably go with a pseudonym since what appeals to me at this point is so far apart.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: I have a couple of stories looking for a home, many more on different stages of ‘ready’, and I’m actively writing my second novel, a supernatural mystery based on the legend of Dighton Rock in Plymouth, Ms.

 Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: The way stories pop up in my mind is usually in the form of short stories and most of the times they work out perfectly that way. Then, there are the rare few which backgrounds just grow to a complexity that needs a novel to be fully explored. I love to use tidbits of real stories, monsters, or legends to use in my stories and then I develop a specific mythology to surround it. When the mythology gets really complex, I just feel compelled to write a novel and invite the reader into this new world I created.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A: I don’t have a favorite as of now, like my kids, I love them all. I do enjoy writing not-so-good guys and for that reason writing Lilibeth was a lot of fun. Megan Jennings is the main character on my newest novel Deliverance and I already know everything about her. She’s gone through a horrible experience but hasn’t really healed, and she’s about to experience things that will test her in ways I would never want to experience myself. I feel bad for her and I don’t know if she’ll come out healed on the other side, or doomed. Right now, she’s my favorite because I can feel her pain on my skin. It’s giving me nightmares.

 Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A: I have a few genres that I enjoy like a kid: Horror, Latin American Literature, Poetry, Biographies, and Historical Fiction. Now, the authors that have had a clear influence on my works are Stephen King, John Saul, Edgar A. Poe, Gustavo A. Bequer, Lorca, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and a few others I can’t remember right now. There’s always a passage or two from each one of these authors that jumps in my mind as I’m writing any given scene. They shine on my head like the Holy Grail I dream of achieving.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors?

A: Do not quit. There will be times when people won’t believe in what you do, when you don’t believe that you can do it, when the whole world and even the gods seem to be against you. Simply keep on writing. You’ll get better. You’ll learn. And sooner or later they will open a door for you, if only because of your insistence, but the door will be open nonetheless.

What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: Like all in this business I’ve been rejected, criticized, and not taken seriously. It comes with the territory. There are good days and bad days; I just try to focus on the really good ones.

About exposure, I have a blog, a Goodreads account, a Facebook account, not Twitter. That’s where I draw the line. At first I got overwhelmed just thinking of a new clever thing I could say to gain ‘likes’, or a cool thing to post, or a new book club I could get into. Soon I was devoting all of my time to the net and not writing. I know better now. I’d say Facebook has been the most helpful for me since it has connected me with a series of people that I genuinely appreciate. It is not about how many ‘friends’ you have, or to how many groups you sign on. It is about human connections. If you help, offer advise, make friends, then they will be there for you when you need help promoting, or advise with that chapter that just doesn’t work, or bona fide true fans of your books.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Georgina Morales is a…”

A: Georgina Morales is a writer in progress that will never give up.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: I could go about the state of the economy, but it’s much too late and The Daily Show’s on. I’ll just say thank you for this opportunity to connect with more people, Ken. To the reader, your fans, thank you for keep going to the last question. If you want to know more about my work, or me just follow the links. I’m a stalker or two short.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Perpetual-Night-by-Georgina-Morales/159894374059399

http://www.darkriverpress.com/index.html

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4646361.Georgina_Morales

Bio: Born in Mexico City, Georgina was always divided between the world of the paranormal, the religious, and science, even as a kid. Through her years in medical school, she experienced and heard all kinds of creepy tales. She, now, writes from her home in Norwalk, Ct. where she resides in the company of her husband and two young daughters. The history of the northeast, its old buildings, and its endless forests provide her imagination with a constant influx of ideas, which combined with her rich background make for her unique style. She’s also a staff reviewer for Dark River Press.

BUY GEORGINA’S STORIES DIRECTLY FROM AMAZON BY CLICKING ON ANY IMAGE BELOW: