Single Question Interview: C Bryan Brown

What is the anatomy of a solid character?

779b733095090a7e9d9a45.L._V195021601_

Generally, that depends on the character, but every solid character must have a few basic things in common.

First and foremost, a solid character needs mass.

For example, ghosts, while they can certainly be well-rounded, entertaining, scary, or sympathetic, just aren’t solid. They walk through walls, fall through floors, disappear in sunlight. It makes them very hard to grab on to, you know, very hard to pin down for anything necessary. As a matter of fact, I don’t think you could put a pin in a ghost because there’s nothing solid to stick!

Actual mass will depend on a variety of factors, but mainly the size of your character. Large characters take up more physical space than, say, small characters. Be sure you remain consistent when writing kids, too. Smaller = less space, but if you’re writing about a juvenile bigfoot, for instance, its mass will be more than a juvenile human of the same age. Cuz, you know, it’s a BIGFOOT.

So, after adding the proper mass, you’ve got a pretty solid character on your hands. But solid doesn’t just mean owning a physical space, having some sort of cosmic address where a body is parked. No, it’s also about the correct bits & pieces being in place. So that means if you’re writing about an alien with three eyes and a tail, you need to make sure those are present and accounted for, always. Tails swish, they flick, people trip over them. While some people trip over nothing, or their own feet, it’s much more likely they’re going to trip over something solid. Everyone knows this.

This same rules apply for writing humans. The women and men characters need to have the proper parts. If needed, switch these parts around, of course, but they need still be present. And switched around means women can have male parts and vice versa, just tucked away where they should be, not, say, sprouting from their foreheads like a unicorn’s horn or reminiscent of a porcupine joke I once heard.

So we’ve covered mass and each character having the proper pieces for what they are. We’ve also seen that you’re allowed to shuffle them around when needed. Think of each character like a Potato Head doll: holes in the arms, legs, head, face, eyes. Put things where they need to go to fit your story.

Seriously, folks, it’s that easy to have proper anatomy on a solid character.

My serious answer to this question, which certainly includes all of the above, is that the anatomy of a solid character is quite simple.

It boils down to duality.

I’ve never known a single person who is all good or all bad (and I use those terms relatively) and that’s what you have to bring to the table when you write characters. You have to recognize that while this character is certainly the baddie, there’s a reason for that. Just like every super hero has an origin story, so does every villain. The villain may very well like Pina Coladas and getting caught in the rain, which aren’t very villainous things at all. But if the villain is nothing but mean and vile, then some of the mass is lost, some of those solid bits you want to stick a pin in.

Conversely, your good guy may shoot a kid in the face and then go home and hug his own.

If you know the goals, motivations, and loves of both your antagonist and protagonist, you essentially have a story tree with two thick, healthy, branches. You can use the leaves from either branch to tell a damn good story. Now, apply the goals, motivations, and loves to your secondary players, give them the same treatment. Now your story tree grows more branches that produce more and more leaves until you have a natural, beautiful canopy through which to stream the sunlight of your story.

***You can pick up Chris’ books through AMAZON.

(Want to take part in a single question interview? Contact me for your question.)

Single Question Interview: Nicholas Conley

What are the challenges in creating a believable character that is younger than you, the writer?

86ad416bdda70ac1d188da.L._V387540968_SY470_.png

It’s certainly very tricky.  As an adult—and especially as an author—I do believe that it’s important not to emotionally separate myself from the personal issues of people who happen to be younger than me; when a person does that, it puts up a kind of barrier, a barrier that blocks the adult from empathizing with younger generations.  It’s a terrible trap, but it’s an exceedingly easy one to get ensnared in.  As an adult, it can be challenging to remember that the terrible struggles that one went through as a child or teenager weren’t laughable.  No, back at the time, these struggles were very important and often very painful.  This is why many teenagers tend to get angry at adults, I believe.  They feel like adults don’t understand them – and the truth is, they often don’t.

Adults tend to glamorize childhood.  Why?  Because back then, we didn’t have to worry so much about finances, relationships, jobs, et cetera.  As a result, it’s incredibly tempting for one to say that childhood was a blissful, happy time of wild abandon.  But I’ve found that for most people, that perception is not really true to life.  Children and teenagers don’t have the freedom that we adults take for granted.  Most children struggle through their early years; they struggle with loneliness, bullying, rebellious tendencies and so on.  Teenagers have to contend with a heightened awareness of their impending adult responsibilities, as well as the sudden onset of messy relationship drama, intensely sexual situations, peer pressure, alcohol and drug use.

When it came to writing Ethan Cage, the protagonist of The Cage Legacy, I made a point to step away from my (at the time) 22-year-old adult self and remember who I really was as a teenager.  I asked myself; what kind of personal issues did I struggle with?  What was important to me at the time?

Of course, since Ethan Cage is the 17-year-old son of a serial killer, his problems are greatly magnified.  Ethan is constantly in a battle to retain control over his emotional impulses; he’s angry at the world, stubborn, frustrated.  He wants to control who he is—his adolescence is like a prison cell to him—and every time another bit of control slips out of his grasp, he panics.  His id grows stronger than his ego with every failure, with every harsh judgment passed upon him.  Though very intelligent, Ethan is a self-conscious introvert who struggles to properly communicate with his loved ones, especially when it comes to his girlfriend, Whitney.  He constantly feels underestimated.  He’s torn between the urge to disappear into the background and the desire for some degree of recognition and/or acclaim.

As adults, it’s easy to look down on a teenager’s problems and say that we “know better.”  But if we do know better, it’s only due to the fact that we went through the trial by fire ourselves, got burned, and came out the other side alive.  Instead of diminishing the importance of teenage tribulations, I think it’s important to really understand where a teenager is coming from.  An adolescent’s pain is no less real than an adult’s suffering, it’s just different.

***You can pick up Nicholas’ books through AMAZON.

(Want to take part in a single question interview? Contact me for your question.)

Single Question Interview: Teel James Glenn

Murder-mystery or mysterious murder?

393346_10150471388069001_1468969540_n

The concept of the conventional murder mystery is puzzle story, a game to be played with the ‘prize’ the satisfaction of solving it.

Murder Most Faire was anything but; it was a way to deal with the pain of a mysterious death of a friend. I took the real events of that terrible day when I found his body and, by weaving in other elements from my adventurous life fashioned a map of my recovery-as-puzzle. I found this was a healing journey for me and realized as I wrote it that it could be just that for others. So the final gift my friend had given to me was being able to lay this path out for others to follow–albeit not everyone can have the satisfaction of being able to drive a sword through their problem…But they should…

***You can pick up Teel’s books through AMAZON.

(Want to take part in a single question interview? Contact me for your question.)

Single Question Interview: Cynthia Pelayo

Is your heritage reflected in your writing?

9c503851863f0ad8976fbe.L._V161798384_

In short, yes. I’m not sure if a lot of people who read my work understand that. I try to not make it obvious that I’m Hispanic in my biography and marketing materials. I don’t want people to avoid my fiction because for whatever reason they haven’t read much fiction by other Latino/a authors. However, I feel maybe I should point it out sometimes to avoid confusion. Once a reviewer wrote something along the lines to me that how dare I caricature Latino characters – my response was ‘How am I caricaturing Latino characters? I’m writing about myself, my husband, my father, my uncles, my friends and our experiences.’ They detracted their response not knowing earlier that I am Hispanic.

It’s difficult for me to look at the world through any other prism. I was born in Puerto Rico, raised in inner city Chicago and by inner city I mean you name it and I’ve seen it: teen pregnancy, drive-by shootings, the deaths of so many young and bright individuals, the cost of poverty and the desperation of loss. So, not only do I write reflecting a bicultural identity, I try to reflect an urban identity. I’ve gone on to college, obtained multiple advanced degrees, work in corporate America but to this day I still live in that inner city neighborhood (by choice) and walk past panaderias (Mexican bakeries) and stop and chat with elderly Puerto Rican men who are out playing dominoes on a sunny Chicago summer day. They are my world and they are the community that raised me, a Latina horror writer who loves her people. There is something magical about speaking Spanish and having this slew of superstitions tied to my Hispanic culture and then having to navigate the English-speaking American reality. It’s both beautiful and sad sometimes. I’ve always felt as though I belong to both but somehow am not fully accepted by either. Perhaps that’s why so many of my characters are outsiders.

***You can pick up Cynthia’s books through AMAZON.

(Want to take part in a single question interview? Contact me for your question.)

Single Question Interview: Emma Ennis

Long fiction or make short work of it?

1c89000754fa0ad8956e9b.L._V138524768_SY470_

To be frankly honest, my dear, I don’t usually have much of a choice. ‘Twas about this time last year I was settling in front of a blank page to jot down the outline for a short story which would go towards filling my second short story collection. An entire weekend and two a4 notepads later, and I was still going.

The thing, which started out as a just a snippet of dialogue I’d hastily scribbled down in some long forgotten moment, just exploded. All of a sudden I had a fully fleshed novel on my hands, and 20,000 words later I had the premise for a sequel and a third in the series.

Needless to say, said short story collection got shoved onto the back burner.

The book was completed around November last year, and is right now nearing the top of the ‘to edit’ pile. I plan to at least flesh out and start the sequel before doing anything with the first because it’s a tricky plot with lots of crossovers, connections and a sprinkling of conspiracy, so I don’t want to miss anything.

But as to short or long fiction, for me they both have their merits and faults. There’s nothing like the feeling of having a bulging notepad in front of you with layouts, characters, maps, pictures, all ready to be translated into a story. It’s a huge challenge, stretching ahead towards a glorious finish line. Picture yourself, if you will, standing at the entrance to the Appalachian Trail, a backpack strapped to your back, brimming with everything you’ll need for the long, arduous journey ahead. I’d like to think that feeling is something akin to starting a new book.

Short stories however, are rewarding in the sense of accomplishment they give. An idea gets wrapped up, tied in a bow and filed under ‘done,’ short and sweet, job done, brush off the hands, next one please.

Personally I’ll take any idea, long or short, as they come. Bring it on!

***You can pick up Emma’s books through AMAZON.

(Want to take part in a single question interview? Contact me for your question.)

Single Question Interview: G Elmer Munson

What makes you click with a character?

397567534db60ac1d18852.L._V390887980_

For me, that’s both an easy and hard question to answer.  The obvious answer is that the character should be likable.  For a protagonist, I have to like the character enough to be willing to see them through whatever nastiness the story has in store for them.  I have to like them enough to hope they come out alive when the story ends.  If I don’t, why keep them?  I have had the occasion where mid-story I realize that I absolutely hate the main character.  This usually occurs right around the time that I kill them off (it’s a reliable indicator).  Someone else becomes the main character and the story goes on.  In most cases, I soon realize that’s what I should have done in the first place.  The story is better because of it.  Other times?  Well, that’s what a trunk is for…

That was easy, right?  Well, the hard part for me is when I take great pleasure in developing a character that I absolutely hate.  Nasty people are fun to write, but that doesn’t mean they’re as fun to read.  Thankfully I learned long ago that first drafts are like playing in a sandbox.  You can throw whatever you want in there and then just rake the crap out later on.  That, of course, is the hard part.  First drafts are fun.  Editing is hard.  That’s the time to take an asshole character and turn them into someone that’s fun to read.  Either that, or go through countless pages of manuscript deleting them from existence.  Both take time, but in the end you’ve got yourself a character worth reading.  That makes the story worth reading.

Villains are a different story altogether.  With villains, all bets are off…

***You can pick up G Elmer’s books through AMAZON.

(Want to take part in a single question interview? Contact me for your question.)

Single Question Interview: Lydia Peever

Vampires, extra-crispy or super-sparkly?

e79554ae9b3a0ad8976f00.L._V388049261_SY470_

There is nothing wrong with a little vampire sparkle. Blood glinting in the moonlight, the look in their eye when they mesmerize; so long as there is a savage aura about them. Vampires are killers. Period. On the other hand, Count Orlok would be about as crispy as I could stand. He did not have one suave bone in his body though, and the most terrifying killer seduces you into a trap you can’t escape. In answer to the question, if I had to have a vampire to dinner I’d like them mostly crispy. A red raw centre, moist with blood. Slather him in a sparkling sauce. Honey-garlic likely, to keep him under control.

***You can pick up Lydia’s books through AMAZON.

(Want to take part in a single question interview? Contact me for your question.)