Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Ginny Gilroy

A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – GINNY GILROY

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A:  I write speculative fiction about extraordinary women. My style can best be described as concise. I often struggle with commas and adjectives, often having not enough of either. In writing as in life I appreciate clarity and directness. Unfortunately, that can sometimes come across as abrupt.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: I’m working on my next novel, Jane Gray. It’s a science fiction book based on a short story, The Secret Life of Jane Gray,  published in the Barren Worlds anthology.

Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: I can’t choose one over the other. Novels give a writer a great deal of space to create a universe. That’s an advantage in writing science fiction. On the other hand I like writing short stories because they are by nature concise.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A:  It’s a toss up between Constance and Jane. Constance is in her way very pure. She has an extraordinary ability to focus. Her life is very ordered and carefully arranged.  When her world turns up side down, she doesn’t compromise her identity.  Jane Gray on the other hand is adaptable and manipulative. Being a rebel corporate executive, she’s a kind of Cyber punk antiheroine.

Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A:  I’ll read everything and anything. One of the reasons I’m so fond of my kindle is because it allows “sampling.” It’s opened me up to books I never would have put my money down to purchase.

Writers I admire, who have influenced my work, are Shirley Jackson, and Frank Herbert. Whenever I get stuck in my prose, I’ll pick up one of their books and just read. Their novels set the bar for my own work.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors? What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: Write every day. There is no other way. There are no deal breakers. I’ve taken breaks from writing to “reset” but always come back.

Exposure is an issue I struggle with on many levels. Pinterest seems to work for me. It’s  personal but not too personal, and concise. I enjoy the challenge of coming up with  interesting captions.  We’ll see if it leads to sales. Twitter did not work for me at all.  I post to Facebook, but it takes a lot of time and effort to really master. Unfortunately in my world both are in short supply.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Ginny Gilroy is a .”

A: Ginny Gilroy is a work in progress.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: Believe me you don’t want to start me on a rant. My website is ginnygilroy.com I update it every quarter or so.

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These Old Tales

“Cain’s unique eye for the macabre makes this collection more than worth it!” — To The Bone Reviews

2014 Nominee for Best Short Story Collection at eFestival of Words.

In his youth Cain developed a sense of wonderment owed in part to TV shows like The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, One Step Beyond and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Now he seeks the same dark overtones in his writing. There’s a little something for every reader within this collection. These 30 short speculative stories represent a time when a discouraged Cain asked his wife what he should do with “these old tales.” Within these pages are those heartbreaks he could not escape.

  • The Patrol – A soldier dreads the solitude of a foxhole when a peculiar visitor surprises him.
  • Molt – While on a business trip, Kyle’s bad day leads to a poor choice.
  • Satisfied – A doctor struggles with playing god.
  • Gladiator David – After the zombie apocalypse our world is reborn in an old familiar place where humans celebrate their revenge.
  • After the Ocolitz – A young girl discovers her father’s fate after the apocalypse.
  • The Necessary Bits – Albi reminisces over his deceased love’s death.
  • Nocturnal – Darkness surrounds George who must battle fear if he means to escape alive.
  • An Eye Remembered – Harry suspects his boss of something terrible and decides to take matters into his own hands.
  • Pieces – A quick story about drowning.
  • The Lucky Shrimp – The grass is always greener, but one who plays with the fates should beware of consequences.

“Cain’s skill as a writer is his ability to take mundane things most of us would never notice and turn them into true terror.” — DarkMedia

 

  • Empty Spaces – Dr. Donald Tomlinson helps a desperate boy reconnect to a grim past where he unwillingly killed his mother.
  • Visitors – A son struggles to convey that his father must leave the nursing home, but his father has made other plans.
  • Working From Home – Sometimes the worst jobs are those you do from home. Such is the case on this dark and stormy night.
  • What’s This Line For? – Abel finds himself standing in line, but can’t remember why.
  • The Evil Within – When the evil becomes too much, Derrick turns to his blade and seeks help at a local church.
  • Meeting Roger – Roger Digsby sounds like a heck of a guy. Unfortunately, Roger’s been murdered and Nick must now interrogate the suspect.
  • The Daily News – Sometimes the news isn’t what you expect. Other times it’s outright maddening.
  • Moving On – A man is forced to acknowledge his past, present, and future.
  • Silt – Tommy and his friends happen upon an atrocity in a local pond.
  • Limbs – Neighbors squabble over the bushes that separate their properties.

“The author deftly inhabits the minds of his protagonists, turning each piece into a sharp characterization that resonates long after it’s (usually) morbid conclusion.” — Goodreads Review

 

  • New Life – Creation has its consequences.
  • Dark Reflections – Eli lost his friends, family, and others to a strange force buried in the junkyard. Now he must try to save them.
  • Fragments – Caleb’s hunger outweighs all other needs. But in his pursuit he encounters someone he hadn’t expected.
  • Edgar’s Church – Edgar troubled past and present is the result of witnessing his father’s death.
  • Anger, Hurt, Pain – A dismal story of suicide.
  • Branded – In this weird western, two men stand off, but a lot can happen while counting to ten.
  • The Regrettable – An old doctor finds himself stranded in his childhood home, faced with an opportunity for redemption.
  • The Way Out – A younger brother escapes his older brother’s wrath.
  • Determination – Tuesday is different, but in this futuristic society, anything but different is expected.
  • Harvest – Even the Amish have horror stories. Discover what this local farmer’s been up to.

Draw up the covers and turn on the lights. Prepare for a journey into the weird, wild, and creepy in this collection of dark fiction stories.

Reviews for THESE OLD TALES:

The Grim Reaper Stalks a Cemetery

Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Georgina Morales

A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – GEORGINA MORALES

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A: My writing has two sides. On the one side there’s the horror/ supernatural stories I’ve always written and on the other there’s the stories about ordinary Joe’s in less than ordinary situations. These stories tend to be based in Dublin and have a comedy/ drama arc to them. My first novel, Pony Fleming being the best example of this and my new novel, The Barn due out this year, an example of the previous.

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A: I’ve been writing a lot of horror and I feel very comfortable with it but I’m already expanding my horizons writing mysteries and thrillers but always with a supernatural twist. At least for now. The other stories that get trapped on my mental strainer are plain straightforward romances. Go figure.

I won’t constrain myself to one genre but I will probably go with a pseudonym since what appeals to me at this point is so far apart.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: I have a couple of stories looking for a home, many more on different stages of ‘ready’, and I’m actively writing my second novel, a supernatural mystery based on the legend of Dighton Rock in Plymouth, Ms.

 Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: The way stories pop up in my mind is usually in the form of short stories and most of the times they work out perfectly that way. Then, there are the rare few which backgrounds just grow to a complexity that needs a novel to be fully explored. I love to use tidbits of real stories, monsters, or legends to use in my stories and then I develop a specific mythology to surround it. When the mythology gets really complex, I just feel compelled to write a novel and invite the reader into this new world I created.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A: I don’t have a favorite as of now, like my kids, I love them all. I do enjoy writing not-so-good guys and for that reason writing Lilibeth was a lot of fun. Megan Jennings is the main character on my newest novel Deliverance and I already know everything about her. She’s gone through a horrible experience but hasn’t really healed, and she’s about to experience things that will test her in ways I would never want to experience myself. I feel bad for her and I don’t know if she’ll come out healed on the other side, or doomed. Right now, she’s my favorite because I can feel her pain on my skin. It’s giving me nightmares.

 Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A: I have a few genres that I enjoy like a kid: Horror, Latin American Literature, Poetry, Biographies, and Historical Fiction. Now, the authors that have had a clear influence on my works are Stephen King, John Saul, Edgar A. Poe, Gustavo A. Bequer, Lorca, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and a few others I can’t remember right now. There’s always a passage or two from each one of these authors that jumps in my mind as I’m writing any given scene. They shine on my head like the Holy Grail I dream of achieving.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors?

A: Do not quit. There will be times when people won’t believe in what you do, when you don’t believe that you can do it, when the whole world and even the gods seem to be against you. Simply keep on writing. You’ll get better. You’ll learn. And sooner or later they will open a door for you, if only because of your insistence, but the door will be open nonetheless.

What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: Like all in this business I’ve been rejected, criticized, and not taken seriously. It comes with the territory. There are good days and bad days; I just try to focus on the really good ones.

About exposure, I have a blog, a Goodreads account, a Facebook account, not Twitter. That’s where I draw the line. At first I got overwhelmed just thinking of a new clever thing I could say to gain ‘likes’, or a cool thing to post, or a new book club I could get into. Soon I was devoting all of my time to the net and not writing. I know better now. I’d say Facebook has been the most helpful for me since it has connected me with a series of people that I genuinely appreciate. It is not about how many ‘friends’ you have, or to how many groups you sign on. It is about human connections. If you help, offer advise, make friends, then they will be there for you when you need help promoting, or advise with that chapter that just doesn’t work, or bona fide true fans of your books.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Georgina Morales is a…”

A: Georgina Morales is a writer in progress that will never give up.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: I could go about the state of the economy, but it’s much too late and The Daily Show’s on. I’ll just say thank you for this opportunity to connect with more people, Ken. To the reader, your fans, thank you for keep going to the last question. If you want to know more about my work, or me just follow the links. I’m a stalker or two short.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Perpetual-Night-by-Georgina-Morales/159894374059399

http://www.darkriverpress.com/index.html

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4646361.Georgina_Morales

Bio: Born in Mexico City, Georgina was always divided between the world of the paranormal, the religious, and science, even as a kid. Through her years in medical school, she experienced and heard all kinds of creepy tales. She, now, writes from her home in Norwalk, Ct. where she resides in the company of her husband and two young daughters. The history of the northeast, its old buildings, and its endless forests provide her imagination with a constant influx of ideas, which combined with her rich background make for her unique style. She’s also a staff reviewer for Dark River Press.

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Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Jason Downes

A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE CURRENT POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR – JASON DOWNES

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A: My writing has two sides. On the one side there’s the horror/ supernatural stories I’ve always written and on the other there’s the stories about ordinary Joe’s in less than ordinary situations. These stories tend to be based in Dublin and have a comedy/ drama arc to them. My first novel, Pony Fleming being the best example of this and my new novel, The Barn due out this year, an example of the previous.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: Well as of now there are a number of projects in the works. The sequel to Pony Fleming is up and running and will have a more American feel with the lads hitting these shores for a visit but will also have the Irish humor and slang from the first.

I also have a book about an alcholic whose life is turned upside down by various tragedies and pulls him deeper and deeper into the bottom of a glass. This one is borrowed heavily from personal experience and although the situations the character finds himself in don’t relate to my own personal experience, the self destruction of the character very much mirrors the same thing done to someone known to me.

There is also a number of shorts which are in the mix and another tale which may run to a full length novel.

Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: For me it all depends on the idea I have. Some stories lend themselves to an indepth and deep dig of the mind, where the story can run and run, and others seem to need a more tapered and simpler conclusion.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A: I’m not so sure, I do have a soft spot for Charles Dashwood, the evil bastard from the upcoming Barn, he really is nasty and venomous piece of hate but he does it so well. I also like Frank Fleming, Pony’s father. Pony was originally thought up as a trilogy but a part of me is debating a book about Frank himself.

Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A: I read many things. I like historical books and biographies. Fiction I love Stephen King, John Connolly, James Herbert, Ken Bruen, the list really goes on. How does its define me? They motivate me to come close to the great things they do. I’d write for free and more or less do but if this could be my job, I’d be happy as could be.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors? What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: The old chestnut…write but also read. Read, read, read and write. The more you read the more ideas you get, the more of those you have the more you’ll write.

Deal breakers I don’t really have. I just hope for the best, I fly by the seat of my arse most days to be honest.

Exposure…here is my weakness, I’m a publicity novice. I do the small things on facebook and what have you but I really need to learn more. My biggest ace has been PMP and my fellow authors, so I owe them alot for that.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Jason Downes is a…”

A: Jason Downes is a…gobshite, whose day will come!! Yet he can write a good story.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: You can find info on Pony either here on PMP or at www.ponyfleming.com I hope to add a new website soon.

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Post Mortem Press Featured Author – Jessica McHugh

A QUICK LITTLE INTERVIEW WITH THE LATEST POST MORTEM PRESS FEATURED AUTHOR

Q: Tell us a little about your writing. What is your typical genre, your style, the voice you aim for and such.

A: I write all varieties of speculative fiction…for now. The truth is I will write anything that pops into my head; it just so happens that most of those stories fit nicely into the SpecFic genre. While I’ve written everything from graphic horror to historical fiction, my voice and style stay the same. I dig a little poetry in my prose, as well as humor even in the darkest of scenes. I have a blast writing stories and I want my readers to have a blast reading them. I like to think the fun comes out in the writing.

Q: What are some of the endeavors you have on the horizon, or have been participating in?

A: I’m working on a lot of projects currently and have lots on the horizon; some of which I can’t speak about quite yet, but suffice to say, 2012 is already a really busy year for this wacky writer chick. I have two novels that I’ll be submitting to publishing houses soon, the last book in my “Tales of Dominhydor” series due for release, I’m halfway through writing “Darla Decker Hates to Wait” which is the 1st novel in a YA series, there are a couple of short films in the planning stages, a handful of short stories being released in anthologies, and I’m working on some stories for the stage as well. I might eat and breathe sometime in there too. Oh and the day job. Sometimes I forget about that…

Q: Do you prefer longer or shorter fiction? And what do you think each provides for your writing?

A: I love writing novels because I’m allowed to really delve into the nitty gritty of my story and characters. For me, it’s easier to go crazy on a novel and then trim the fat, rather than write everything I want in a short story and have to trim the meat in order to hit a word count. A lot of times when I write a short story, I think about how I could turn it into a novel one day. Then again, I’ve done that with plays I’ve written too. I guess I’m just a novel girl.

Q: Let us know a little about your favorite character that you have created, and what makes them your favorite?

A: That is really tough. I would say Delaney Lortal from “Song of Eidolons” is my favorite, but if I explained why I’d give away a lot of the secrets in that story. I also love Faye Norton from “Rabbits in the Garden”, but I feel weird saying such an evil character is my favorite, so, I’m going to go with Captain Jack Racine from “The Sky: The World”. He’s the epitome of the charming asshole guy so many chicks love…or just love to fantasize about. He’s a lush for liquor and laudanum and sleeps with a different girl nearly every night. He wants to be a good guy, but it’s against his nature, so he stopped trying long ago. The only thing that spurs him into trying in “The Sky: The World” is the death of his brother, who was the best man Jack knew. All of a sudden, he has a purpose and he will stop at nothing to achieve it. I’ve written similar characters, but there’s no one quite like Captain Jack Racine.

Q: What do you typically read and how do those authors help to define your own writing?

A: I typically enjoy twisted tales like Roald Dahl’s macabre short stories. They definitely contributed to my style when I first started writing seriously at 19. Every story had a Dahlesque twist or sounded like a Lovecraft knock-off. Luckily, I’ve improved a lot since then and truly made the stories my own. “A Ride in the Dream Machine”, to be included in Post Mortem Press’ “Torn Realities” Lovecraft Anthology, was one of the first short stories I wrote during that time. For the anthology, I tore it apart and completely rewrote it, but thanks to 19 year old Jess, I had the backbone. The flesh just needed to be rearranged. Roald Dahl still influences me though, as well as Bret Easton Ellis, Stephen King, and Anne Rice.

Q: What advice might you offer to other writers in their endeavors? What things have you experienced as set backs and potential deal breakers? Also, what things have helped you to gain exposure, bring attention to your stories?

A: My advice to writers is to write. Write wonderfully. Write horribly. Write happy stories. Write heart-wrenching stories. Write stories that make you shout “Victory!” from your rooftop. Write stories that make you want to puke up your $10 six-pack. Write and write and write until people can’t question who or what you are. You’re a writer. You write.

For me, there are no dealbreakers. I might lie for a living (and yes, writing is my living, seeing as it hasn’t killed me yet), but I’m not unrealistic. I know there’s a huge chance I won’t ever be able to ditch my day job, but I will never stop writing. The need is deeper than my bones, blood, and soul. It’s stitched into a part of me that can’t be defined because it was forged from fiction long, long ago. People ask me how I stay so motivated to write and I can never find a helpful answer because that nameless piece keeps me motivated. If I have a free moment, it orders me to write and I happily obey.

I have garnered some attention from my Facebook and Twitter pages. I try to post interesting quotes from my work, as well as random witticisms. I’ve actually had quite a few people buy my books based on those postings and stated as such in their reviews. I enjoy connecting with my fans and followers because it shows them that I’m not only a real person, but I’m a pretty damn rowdy, fun one. I like to enjoy my life and writing and I believe that’s pretty obvious when you read my posts as well as my fiction.

Q: Finish this sentence, “Jessica McHugh is a…”

A: Jessica McHugh is an ink addict who seeks no cure.

Q: Anything else you would like to promote, say, or rant about?

A: Thank you for providing such wonderful questions, Ken. I had an awesome time answering them. I’m always rocking out at my Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/Author.JessicaMcHugh and my Twitter at @theJessMcHugh for anyone who’d like to follow me.

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Jessica-McHugh/e/B003NUKAA4
Website: www.JessicaMcHughBooks.com
Blog: http://www.mcnito.blogspot.com/
Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jessica_McHugh

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